PRESS RELEASE

Wacom Intuos Creative Stylus 2

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TOKYO and VANCOUVER, Wash., Sept. 4, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Building on the success of its predecessor, Wacom's new Intuos Creative Stylus 2 comes with a fine solid tip for increased visibility and intricate detail for sketching, drawing and painting on an iPad. A premium on-the-go solution for creative professionals, it now also offers USB charging options, a flared front to support a variety of holding styles and side-switch for ease of use. This combination of quality design and superior features provides the perfect tool for artists and designers to work anytime and anywhere.

Ideal for professionals and dedicated enthusiasts who frequently use iPads in their workflow, the new Intuos Creative Stylus 2 is the essential tool for producing pen and paper-style sketches and concept drawings on an iPad. Offering 2,048 pressure sensitivity levels, the user experience is further enhanced thanks to Bluetooth 4.0 that seamlessly connects the stylus to iPads and Wacom's Cloud services. Available soon,  the two new cloud based services offer clipboard functionality (DropZone) that allow for the exchange of files between different devices and a storage service for individual pen, tablet and display settings (ControlRoom).

Like all products in the Intuos range, Intuos Creative Stylus 2 is beautifully designed and made using brushed aluminium and a soft touch silicone grip. Available in black and grey, this design tool also boasts an ergonomic shape that makes it is particularly comfortable to use even after numerous hours. Additionally, artists can save time with the two conveniently located shortcut buttons located on the barrel of the pen. A protective carry case holds the stylus, USB charging cable and replacement nibs and make the stylus the ultimate pocket sized companion for today's on-the-go designer.

Designed for the iPad 3, iPad 4, mini and Air, the Intuos Creative Stylus 2 is compatible with the top five creative apps including Wacom's Bamboo Paper, SketchBook Pro for iPad (by Autodesk), ArtRage (by Ambient Design), ProCreate (by Savage Interactive) and more. While using the stylus with compatible apps, it becomes highly responsive to light strokes while rejecting unintentional touches made whilst resting palms on the iPad's screen. When connecting the stylus to Bamboo Paper, users will have free access to the 'Creative Pack' including all brushes and writing tools as well as all artists type notebooks with various canvases and papers particularly for drawing and painting.

Pricing and Availability 
The Intuos Creative Stylus 2 is priced at $79.95 (USD) and will be available in October from the Wacom eStore and select retail locations.

Wacom Bamboo Stylus fineline

TOKYO and VANCOUVER, Wash., Sept. 4, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Wacom today announces Bamboo fineline. Crafted with care from high quality materials, fineline is a smart stylus with new "thin tip" technology that makes navigating, writing, sketching and sharing on an iPad feel effortless. Encouraging creative expression and inspiring ideas when working digitally, its features also include pressure sensitivity and palm rejection for increased precision and a more fluid action. With an elegant and premium design, Bamboo Stylus fineline is available in five fresh colors – silver, grey, blue, orange and pink. The pressure sensitivity and solid tip of the stylus make it feel completely natural to use. With its 1024 pressure levels, it reacts to the pressure being applied by the user, resulting in lighter or stronger strokes accordingly. This increased precision makes writing and notetaking on an iPad effortless. In addition, the palm rejection feature instantly knows the difference between a hand or the stylus, meaning a user's hand can comfortably rest on the screen while using the pen. The battery, required to establish Bluetooth connection, lasts approximately 26 hours, but can be easily recharged via USB.

The user experience is further enhanced thanks to Bluetooth 4.0 that seamlessly connects the stylus to iPads and Wacom's Cloud services such as DropZone, which offers clipboard functionality, allowing files to be exchanged between different devices, and ControlRoom, a storage service for individual pen, tablet and display settings. Both services are now being tested thoroughly and will be available soon.

Bamboo Stylus fineline is supported by some leading note taking apps on the market, including Wacom's own Bamboo Paper app, Noteshelf, Notes Plus, INKredible, GoodReader and MyScript. When connected to Bamboo Paper the user is offered free access to the 'fineline Pack' offering an additional pencil and the Writer or Maker type notebooks, perfectly adapted to note taking, ideation and light sketching.

Mike Gay, Head of Wacom Consumer Business, describes Wacom's strategy: "Even in this digital age, people use their hands to express thought and ideas. Writing and sketching are still performed to help free minds and encourage creativity. This explains why we continue to develop hardware, software and infrastructures that empower people to do what they want, but be part of the digital lifestyle." 

Availability and pricing 
Bamboo Stylus fineline will be showcased on the Wacom booth (hall 12, stand 104) at IFA 2014 in Berlin from 5th to 10th September. From today, it will be available to purchase on the Wacom eStore as well as various retailers across the Americas. Bamboo Stylus fineline is priced at $59.95 (USD).

Bamboo Stylus Solo

Bamboo Stylus Solo

Bamboo Stylus Duo

Bamboo Stylus Duo

Wacom Bamboo Stylus solo and duo

TOKYO and VANCOUVER, Wash., Sept. 4, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Living in the digital age, computers and all kinds of mobile devices have become such a natural part of daily life, most people do not think about whether to use them, but only how they could be made even more intuitive and comfortable. That is also true for all touchscreen devices, says Mike Gay, Head of Wacom Consumer Business: "There are a lot of navigation functions that feel much easier using a pen instead of your fingers – let alone writing or drawing."

Undisputedly a pen is the most natural tool for human beings to express thoughts and ideas. Based on a 30 year legacy of inventing, developing and manufacturing digital pen devices, Wacom now presents 3rd generation Bamboo Stylus solo (for capacitive devices) and Bamboo Stylus duo as a combination with a traditional ball pen for use on capacitive devices and all sorts of paper. Both products carry a new, carbon coated rubber tip that makes sure of a very smooth and near-natural feel while writing, sketching or navigating directly on the screen. Wacom also introduces some fresh colors: "People can choose from six trendy colours: silver and grey for the traditionalists and shiny blue, bright green, sunny orange and girlish pink for the 'fashionistas.'"

Availability and pricing 
The newly introduced third generation Bamboo Stylus solo and Bamboo Stylus duo as well as the Bamboo Stylus fineline and Intuos Creative Stylus 2 will be showcased at IFA. All products can be tested at Wacom´s booth (hall 12, stand 104) for the first time. Available in Wacom´s eStore and various retailers as of today the Bamboo Stylus duo is priced at $29.95 (USD), the Bamboo Stylus solo at $19.95 (USD).

For further information please check out the website: http://www.wacom.com/en/gb/everyday


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Before I was hoarding Windows 8 tablets and convertibles, I was an insatiable iOS art app collector: always on the lookout for the application that would unlock the iPad's creative possibilities.

I know this is a silly pursuit because truly talented artists have been able to produce masterpieces on their iPads from day one. But those of us who never mastered finger painting like to convince ourselves that we would be better artists "if only" the hardware and software we used had feature x or y.  And though I'd never used a Cintiq, I also knew that there had to be a better tablet drawing experience than the fat Q-tip feel of most of the iPad's early pens.

If you were paying attention to this space back in 2011, you may also remember reading about Microsoft's Courier project, which was a wholly unique take on the tablet form factor that was unceremoniously killed before getting to market. When some of the creatives behind the Courier resurfaced in early 2012 as iOS developer Fifty Three,  their first product Paper for the iPad was accompanied by gushing press reviews. Seriously, just take a moment to contemplate the following quote from The Verge:

...the humanistic sensibilities that made the Courier so attractive are very much present in this app, unbound from the chains at Microsoft.

Ugh. Anyhow, I purchased Paper and found it to offer one of the more pleasant brush engines available on the iPad, though it was hindered by a strange sketchbook metaphor. Overall the app felt better suited to notetaking or doodling than serious drawing and I quickly set it aside (along with the iPad and a dozen or so other iOS art tools when the Surface Pro was finally released). 

In Fifty Three's Paper for iPad, projects are organized as sketchbooks that each begin with ten blank pages.

The brush engine in Paper is one of the finest on the iPad, though it is limited by the lack of pressure sensitivity. The app is free, but each tool is a separate in-app purchase, so the final price is actually about $17. 

The brush engine in Paper is one of the finest on the iPad, though it is limited by the lack of pressure sensitivity. The app is free, but each tool is a separate in-app purchase, so the final price is actually about $17. 

When I was contacted by co-developer Ryan Harris of Silicon Benders to tell me about his recently released Windows 8 app Sketchable, I had to do a double take.

Sketchable is a virtual clone of Paper. The programs are so similar I had to ask Harris whether he or his developer brother were former employees of Fifty Three or Microsoft. (They aren't.) The brothers Harris are based in Northern Florida and enlisted the aid of industry veteran John Deery (co-founder of Painter) and artist Don Seegmiller during their 18-month development process.

Just like Paper, Sketchable uses a sketchbook metaphor. Each sketchbook defaults to ten pages, but you can easily add or delete pages as necessary. And also just like Paper, Sketchable is a free app, but each tool requires a separate in-app purchase. Although this model isn't ideal, it's hard to quibble since the all-in cost is only $11.99.

Where Sketchable stands out vs. Paper is beneath its simplistic surface. Nearly every feature is customizable. There are 13 standard sketchbook cover options (though curiously I wasn't able to add my own with the camera icon). Each tool (eraser, brush, airbrush, pencil, marker, pen, inking nib and chalk) comes with four presets which can be overwritten and expanded to eight. Double tapping on any tool brings up a long menu of options for stroke background, shape, diameter, roundness, feather, angle, spacing, scatter, stroke opacity, concentration, accumulation and more. There are also 18 standard paper textures, each with its own set of customization options.

Sketchable is clearly a pretty amazing application. But many potential users may be turned off by its similarity to Paper. My advice to the developers would be to branch out in a new direction stylistically so they won't be mistaken for mere copycats. All this effort shouldn't risk being dismissed at first glance.   

A version for Windows RT was just released, making Sketchable one of the few "serious" art apps available for the Surface RT and Surface 2. However, in my experience, the coarse digitizer on the Surface RT made it very difficult to produce desirable results with any of the capacitive stylii I own, including the higher end Adonit Jot Pro or Wacom Bamboo. Most of my strokes had some degree of jitter and the RT often missed strokes. Users of the Surface 2 will have to tell me whether that device's digitizer fares any better.

The program runs extremely well on both the Surface Pro 1 and 2. It's great to see a pressure sensitive Windows Store app and I hope other developers follow suit. I didn't have a chance to test Sketchable on either of my N-Trig convertibles yet, but I assume they'll work correctly. I'll update this post if I find out otherwise.

Although I wish more of the power features were exposed in charms, the program is still extremely touch/tablet friendly and should definitely be considered by any Windows tablet user.

Each Sketchable project begins as a 10-page sketchbook. The are 18 default cover options currently available. The camera icon on my version is ghosted, but I assume the ability to customize covers is in the works.

Each Sketchable project begins as a 10-page sketchbook. The are 18 default cover options currently available. The camera icon on my version is ghosted, but I assume the ability to customize covers is in the works.

Once inside a sketchbook, the UI is very simple. Settings and camera/picture load options are on the top right and tools, paper texture and color palette is on the bottom. The free version ships with only the eraser and brush. All other tools (including the color picker!) are sold seperately in-app. Total cost is $11.99

Once inside a sketchbook, the UI is very simple. Settings and camera/picture load options are on the top right and tools, paper texture and color palette is on the bottom. The free version ships with only the eraser and brush. All other tools (including the color picker!) are sold seperately in-app. Total cost is $11.99

Double tapping on a tool brings up one of the presets. Most tools come with four presets but these can be modified or expanded by the user. Selecting the brush icons allows you to change the stroke interactively. The lock prevents further changes to the preset.

Double tapping on a tool brings up one of the presets. Most tools come with four presets but these can be modified or expanded by the user. Selecting the brush icons allows you to change the stroke interactively. The lock prevents further changes to the preset.

The info button brings up a long list of customization options. Shown above are just a few of the settings for the brush Diameter. Unfortunately because they're shown in this windowed format, going through all the settings requires a lot of scrolling. I also didn't like the value sliders. It's very difficult to dial in a precise number. Hopefully in future revisions, the developers can move some of these settings to Charms.

The info button brings up a long list of customization options. Shown above are just a few of the settings for the brush Diameter. Unfortunately because they're shown in this windowed format, going through all the settings requires a lot of scrolling. I also didn't like the value sliders. It's very difficult to dial in a precise number. Hopefully in future revisions, the developers can move some of these settings to Charms.

There are 18 standard paper textures, each with its own set of customization options.

There are 18 standard paper textures, each with its own set of customization options.

Screenshot (35).png

Even the color picker is sold separately.

Definitive proof that it's not the tools, it's the talent...

Painted by Kyle Lambert www.kylelambert.co.uk The world's most realistic finger painting. Using only a finger, an iPad Air and the app Procreate, artist Kyle Lambert has painted a photorealistic portrait of actor Morgan Freeman. Music by Richard Woolgar

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AuthorRick Rodriguez
TagsiPad
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It seems like everything related to Apple must come with its share of marketing hyperbole (and a well-shot video).

Witness Fifty Three's Pencil. The guys behind Microsoft's canceled Courier project founded their own studio and released Paper for iPad about two years ago. It's a very nice and very simple drawing app.

Watch the video below to see the app in action with the company's new bluetooth Pencil. Breathless hype from The Verge's Ellis Hamburger ("the best iPad stylus yet") aside, it's like drawing with a big crayon.

Great tools inspire great ideas. Pencil is the most natural and expressive tool for getting ideas on Paper. Advanced technology meets beautiful design to keep you in the flow, without needing to switch tools. With Erase, Blend, and adaptive Palm Rejection, Pencil puts creative possibility in your hands. Learn more about Pencil: fiftythree.com/pencil Download Paper: itunes.apple.com/us/app/paper-by-fiftythree/id506003812?mt=8 Director: Andrew S Allen Editing & Post Production: Kristofer Martin Original Score: Patrick Cannell (patrickcannell.com) Recording & Mastering: Jeremy Sklarsky (jeremysklarsky.com) Cellist: Dave Eggar (https://www.facebook.com/daveeggar) Recorded at Threshold Studios (thresholdstudios.com) Music Supervision: Good Ear Music Supervision (goodear.tv) Production: Allen Lau, Amy Cao, Denis Kovacs, KJ Chun, Jason Sondhi, Tara Feener Special Thanks: Chana Lee Mitty, Jen Mussari, and Amit Pitaru

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AuthorRick Rodriguez
Categoriesnews

PRESS RELEASE

Marvel Entertainment Announces Creativity Studio Stylus and App for iPad Combined, the Stylus and App let kids learn to draw their favorite Marvel characters and will be available in time for the Holidays.

Giant Marvel stylus for iPad?

Glendale, Calif. (October 24, 2013) - Disney Consumer Products (DCP) and Marvel Entertainment today announced the launch of the Marvel Creativity Studio Stylus and App, created by eKids, exclusively for iPad. The app delivers a creative space for kids to learn to draw, color and animate their favorite Marvel Super Heroes and villains from Avengers Assemble, The Ultimate Spider-Man and Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H., while the stylus adds special and enhanced play value.

"The Marvel Creativity Studio is an innovative way for fans of all ages to learn how to draw some of Marvel's most popular Super Heroes while allowing them to use their imagination to feel like they're part of the action," said Josh Silverman, executive vice president of global franchise licensing and commercialization at Disney Consumer Products. "Leveraging the comic drawing history of the Marvel brand with the innovation that eKids brings to the table - or in this case, tablet - this product delivers a fun experience with endless play value."

App and Stylus features include:

*        Professionally illustrated coloring pages, where you can add your

own flare with tons of drawing tools and an extensive color pallet

*        Use of the stylus to unlock special tools including the " Reveal"

tool to flawlessly color the page like a pro

*        An interactive grid system that includes specialty drawing aids

such as side-by-side drawing canvas, trace lines and unique "Drawing Scope" - allowing artists of all levels to successfully learn how to draw these characters

*        Build and animate action scenes with character stickers, sound

effects, speech bubbles and backgrounds

*        Create your own custom stickers and add them to animated scenes

The Stylus - which includes unlimited access to all content and future updates - is available at mass retailers.  A deluxe version with a limited edition zippered carry case is available exclusively at Apple Retail Stores and from the Apple Online Store; both retail for $34.99. The Marvel Creativity Studio app is FREE and may be found at www.appstore.com/MarvelCreativityStudio<http://www.appstore.com/MarvelCreativityStudio>.

For more information, visit www.eKids.com<http://www.ekids.com/>.

#   #   #

About Disney Consumer Products

Disney Consumer Products (DCP) is the business segment of The Walt Disney Company (NYSE:DIS) that delivers innovative and engaging product experiences across thousands of categories from toys and apparel to books and fine art. As the world's largest licensor, DCP inspires the imaginations of people around the world by bringing the magic of Disney into consumers' homes with products they can enjoy year-round. DCP is comprised of three business units: Licensing, Publishing and Disney Store.

The Licensing business is aligned around five strategic brand priorities:

Disney Media, Classics & Entertainment, Disney & Pixar Animation Studios, Disney Princess & Disney Fairies, Lucasfilm and Marvel. Disney Publishing Worldwide (DPW) is the world's largest publisher of children's books, magazines, and digital products and also includes an English language learning business, consisting of over 40 Disney English learning centers across China and a supplemental learning book program. DPW's growing library of digital products includes best-selling eBook titles and original apps that leverage Disney content in innovative ways. The Disney Store retail chain operates across North America, Europe and Japan with more than 350 stores worldwide and is known for providing consumers with high-quality, unique products. Disney's official shopping portals online are www.DisneyStore.com<http://www.disneystore.com/> and www.DisneyStore.co.uk<http://www.disneystore.co.uk/>. For more information, please visit Disney Consumer Products www.DisneyConsumerProducts.com<http://www.disneyconsumerproducts.com/> or follow us at www.YouTube.com/DisneyLiving<http://www.youtube.com/DisneyLiving>,

www.Facebook.com/DisneyLiving<http://www.facebook.com/DisneyLiving>,

www.Twitter.com/DisneyLiving<http://www.twitter.com/DisneyLiving> and www.Pinterest.com/DisneyLiving<http://www.pinterest.com/DisneyLiving>.

About Marvel Entertainment, LLC

Marvel Entertainment, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is one of the world's most prominent character-based entertainment companies, built on a proven library of over 8,000 characters featured in a variety of media over seventy years. Marvel utilizes its character franchises in entertainment, licensing and publishing. For more information, visit marvel.com<http://www.marvel.com/>.

About eKids

eKids, a distributor of cutting edge electronics in collaboration with iHome, now brings your favorite licensed characters to life on iHome's award-winning and innovative products. We combined state-of-the-art technology with preeminent licensed characters from some of the world's biggest brands. The result is a line of interactive apps and styluses, fashion forward speaker systems, alarm clocks, headphones, ear buds, and iPod and mp3 docks that appeal to trendsetters of all ages looking for quality electronics and fun activities featuring iconic characters they love.


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AuthorRick Rodriguez
Categoriesnews

Jonathan Woodard is a professional designer, illustrator and animator who literally wrote a book on how to "Create Comics on the IPad." Also known as "mastajwood," he created the iPad comic book "Samuel J. Coffy: Action Panda Cop" and is currently working on a wide variety of comics projects and covers.

Jon recently made the switch to the Surface Pro and agreed to share some details on his workflow. The artwork below was created in Sketchbook Pro.

You can follow his work at http://mastajwood.tumblr.com/

By Jonathan Woodard

I too have switched from using an iPad to Win 8 devices. I had originally switched to the Samsung ATIV Smart PC but after seeing how much smoother Sketchbook Pro was on the Surface Pro (in the Penny Arcade inking video), I now have switched to the Surface because of the i5 versus the ATIV Smart PC 500's Atom processor. I'm loving the switch and the Surface Pro is the perfect mobile creative tablet.

Below is a breakdown of my process, all done on the Surface Pro with Sketchbook Pro and Photoshop.

First I do a really loose sketch of what I want. Keeping it really loose keeps the energy in the final piece.

Next I make a new layer and do the lineart for the body to make sure the shape is right.

I do the armor lineart on a new layer, so that I can have variant versions of the same print.

Next I lay down the flats. Skin and hair is on one layer, armor and clothing is on another layer.

Next I'll add the shadows and highlights. Shadows for the skin and hair again are separate from the shadow layer of the armor. Up to this point it's all been done in Sketchbook Pro. I'll then create my background using illustrator and comp the two together in Photoshop with final lighting and textures.

Posted
AuthorRick Rodriguez
CategoriesTips

You may recall the kerfuffle when Oprah Winfrey tweeted that the Surface RT was one of her "favorite things"...from an iPad. Pretty embarrassing (and I hope Microsoft got its promotional dollars back).

So it was with some trepidation that I decided to write this post using the iOS Squarespace app. Yes, the creation of this blog has been 100% Windows so far, but that doesn't mean I won't need to write something on the run in the future.

And most importantly, we're fairly OS agnostic here. We'll use anything so long as it gets the job done. We fully intend to do head to head comparisons between the Surface Pro, iPad, Nexus 7 and any other device that might fit in a professional or hobbyist artist's toolkit.

And to prove it, here's an oldie but goodie speed painting video from iPad artist David Jon Kassan, who works miracles with his finger tips. We're not worthy.